Toxic chemical found in dog killed by poisoned meatball at Mistletoe State Park, test results say

Thursday, Jan. 2, 2020
News 12 at 6 O’Clock/NBC at 7

Ripit died after his owner said he ate poisoned raw meat at a park. (Source: Sammi Flynn)

AUGUSTA, GA (WRDW/WAGT) – The results are back from the toxicology report on those poisoned meatballs that killed a dog at Mistletoe State Park.

Turns out it was a chemical called Aldicarb that the EPA actually banned for commercial use back in 2017.

It wasn't easy to find a lab that would analyze what's inside the stomach of a dead animal.

“I contacted University of Georgia and they referred me to Michigan State University,” Georgia DNR Game Warden Chris Adkins said.

Along with Aldicarb, a toxic chemical used in pesticides, caffeine was also found in the poisoned meat.

Aldicarb is so toxic, according to the National Institute of Health, only seven drops could kill a person.

“The report stated that the presence of caffeine indicated a misuse of a pesticide for the intent of baiting,” Adkins said.

Adkins says baiting isn’t allowed.

“This wouldn’t be something that anybody would put out,” Adkins said. “There’s other ways to manage a nuisance wildlife problem if that’s what somebody was doing.”

Dr. Sammi Flynn, the owner of the dog that was killed, says life hasn’t been easy without her pup, Ripit.

“I've gotten it down to where I can sit down for 30 minutes a day and just cry,” Flynn said.

But Flynn says her family has adopted a new dog even though it’ll never replace Ripit.

“I literally hike with a gun, medicines for snake bites, medicines for bee stings, medicines for wounds, everything,” Flynn said. “I did not have Atropine on me. I never expected to need Atropine.”

If it won't find who did this, she says she hopes increasing her reward to $10,000 will at least give pet owners some peace of mind.

“I'll never know who did it, but at least the park will be safe for somebody else,” Flynn said.

Flynn says she hasn't been back to Mistletoe State Park since the incident. It's just been too painful. If you know anything about who could have done this, call the Ranger Hotline at 1-800-241-4113 or call the Georgia DNR’s local office at 706-595-4211.

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