NCAA urges California governor not to sign 'fair pay' bill

Though the judge ruled in favor of the plaintiffs and against the NCAA, the ruling didn't go as far as the plaintiffs would have liked.
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Wednesday, Sept. 11, 2019

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The NCAA Board of Governors wants California Gov. Gavin Newsom to reject a new attempt to pay college athletes.

And it is prepared to take the fight to court if necessary.

In a six-paragraph letter released Wednesday, the board urged Newsom not to sign the legislation known as the Fair Pay to Play Act, which would allow college athletes to be paid for the use of their names, likenesses and images. The move comes two days after approval of the measure by the California Assembly, with the state Senate expected to consider the measure later this week.

The board warned that California schools may be declared ineligible for NCAA competition if the bill becomes law because they would have an unfair recruiting advantage.

"We've explored how it might impact the association and what it might do. We believe it would inappropriately affect interstate commerce," Donald Remy, the NCAA's chief operating officer and chief legal officer, told The Associated Press. "It is not intended to be a threat at all. It's a reflection about the way California is going about this.

"I'm not saying there will never be a day we would consider that (legal action), but it is not meant to be a threat," Remy said.

The NCAA said the measure would affect more than 24,000 athletes in the nation's most populous state.

Should the bill pass, Newsom would have 30 days to sign or veto it. If he does nothing, the bill would become law. It would be the first measure of its kind and the outcome is being closely watched as one of the biggest challenges in years to the NCAA's longstanding and far-reaching model of amateur sports. Over the past decade, that model has come under increasing pressure — and attacks in court — as critics push for big-time college athletics to clear the way for the athletes themselves to benefit financially.