New genome mapping change tests for blood cancer

A new optical genome mapping at Augusta University Medical Center and the Medical College of Georgia is changing the way doctors test patients for blood cancers
Published: Jan. 23, 2023 at 4:37 PM EST
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AUGUSTA, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) - A new optical genome mapping at Augusta University Medical Center and the Medical College of Georgia is changing the way doctors test patients for blood cancers and other conditions.

Doctors say it is more accurate than older technology because they’re able to see the DNA in high resolution. It also can cut about ten days out of waiting for results, which allows them to identify, diagnose, and treat patients faster and more effectively.

Dr. Ravindra Kolhe, interim chair of the department of pathology at MCG, says, “We can identify different prognoses so that better treatment plans can be done.”

“Anyone who has active cancer going on every single day makes a pretty significant difference in outcomes, so having that information that early definitely will make a difference.”

AU Health Center and the Georgia Cancer Center will be the first medical center in the country to use this technology to test patients. Doctors anticipate testing will begin as soon as next week.