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Keeping schools out of NIL dealings opened door for boosters

FILE - In this March 18, 2015, file photo, the NCAA logo is displayed at center court as work...
FILE - In this March 18, 2015, file photo, the NCAA logo is displayed at center court as work continues at The Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh, for the NCAA college basketball tournament. The NCAA has fallen short of upholding its commitment to gender equity spending more on male athletes on average than female ones according a second review. A law firm hired by the NCAA to investigate equity issues released a 153-page report Tuesday night, Oct. 26, 2021 that includes a series of recommendations to improve the gap.(Keith Srakocic | AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)
Published: May. 17, 2022 at 11:00 PM EDT
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(AP) - The NCAA seems to have inadvertently opened the door for boosters when it comes to college athletes cashing in on their fame.

The NCAA is hoping to rein in booster-fueled organizations known as collectives. Part of the solution could be taking down the firewalls between athletic departments and athletes when it comes to name, image and likeness compensation. Jim Cavale is the CEO of INFLCR, a company that helps schools manage NIL programming and compliance. He says allowing boosters to have more involvement in NIL deals than schools makes no sense.

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