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NASA: Total lunar eclipse happening over weekend

On Sunday, the Earth will start casting its shadow over the moon for a total lunar eclipse that...
On Sunday, the Earth will start casting its shadow over the moon for a total lunar eclipse that will last into the overnight hours.(Mohamed shehata via canva)
Published: May. 11, 2022 at 5:57 PM EDT
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(Gray News) - On Sunday, the Earth will cast its shadow over the moon, and we should start seeing the total lunar eclipse that evening.

According to NASA, the moon will begin entering the partial shadow of Earth at 9:32 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on Sunday. But the slight darkening of the moon will not stand out until the moon starts entering the full shadow of the Earth at 10:28 p.m. ET.

It will take until 11:29 p.m. for the full shadow of Earth to cover the moon. The peak of the eclipse will be at 12:11 a.m. ET on May 16.

Officials said the moon will begin emerging from the full shadow of the Earth at 12:54 a.m. ET and finish emerging from the full shadow at 1:55 a.m. ET.

The moon will finish exiting the partial shadow at 2:51 a.m. ET, but the subtle shading from this last part of the eclipse will be difficult to notice.

The lunar eclipse will be visible anywhere the moon is visible. NASA reports lunar eclipses occur during the full moon phase. So, the moon will generally be visible starting around sunset.

A lunar eclipse occurs when Earth gets directly between the sun and moon. The sun’s rays then get blocked by Earth and cause a shadow that darkens the moon.

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