Mumps cases rising in vaccinated children, report says

FILE - According to the report, a total of 9,172 pediatric cases of mumps were reported during...
FILE - According to the report, a total of 9,172 pediatric cases of mumps were reported during that time range and 87% of those patients had received at least one dose of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine.(AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)
Published: Dec. 2, 2021 at 1:31 PM EST
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(Gray News) - A study recently published by the American Academy of Pediatrics said the majority of mumps cases reported in the United States since 2007 occurred in children and adolescents who were vaccinated.

“After the introduction of mumps vaccine in 1967, U.S. mumps cases declined by more than 99%; however, since 2006 there has been an increase in mumps cases, with outbreaks reported in schools and other settings involving vaccinated children and adolescents,” the report said.

Researchers analyzed mumps cases reported by U.S. health departments to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System between 2007 and 2019.

According to the report, a total of 9,172 pediatric cases of mumps were reported during that time range, and 87% of those patients had received at least one dose of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine.

The study said pediatric mumps cases have been reported in most states each year since 2016.

Results suggest clinicians should suspect mumps in patients who present symptoms, regardless of age, travel history or vaccination status.

Scientists say it’s not clear why there has been a resurgence in mumps cases over the last decade, but believe a number of factors, including a lack of prior exposure to the virus or waning immunity could be affecting immunity in vaccinated people.

Mumps is known for the puffy cheeks and tender jaw it causes as a result of swollen salivary glands, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

The CDC says some people who get mumps have very mild symptoms, like a cold, or no symptoms at all.

The contagious disease is spread through direct contact with saliva or respiratory droplets from the mouth, nose or throat.

Most patients recover completely within two weeks.

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