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Gas prices staying lower in Augusta than elsewhere in Georgia

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Gas pump(WRDW)
Published: Aug. 9, 2021 at 11:03 AM EDT
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AUGUSTA, Ga. - Georgia gas prices are mostly unchanged in the past week, averaging $2.92 a gallon today, according to GasBuddy’s daily survey of 5,883 stations in Georgia.

Like last week, Augusta drivers are getting a better deal than their peers in Georgia. Average gas prices here remain at $2.88 a gallon, unchanged from last Monday.

The average gas price in Macon is the same as in Augusta, but Atlanta drivers are paying a little more, $2.97 a gallon, unchanged from last Monday.

Gas prices in Georgia are 2.1 cents per gallon higher than a month ago and stand 98.6 cents per gallon higher than a year ago.

According to GasBuddy price reports, the cheapest station in Georgia is priced at $2.61 a gallon today while the most expensive is $3.29 a gallon, a difference of 68 cents.

“Georgia gas prices saw minimal or no change at the pumps across the state,” said Montrae Waiters, spokeswoman AAA-The Auto Club Group. “August could prove to be more expensive if crude oil prices increase, driven by market concerns of rising COVID case numbers and how that could negatively affect global demand in the near future.”

Across the river in South Carolina, gas prices have fallen 0.7 cent per gallon in the past week, to an average of $2.87 per gallon, according to GasBuddy. That’s 2.4 cents per gallon higher than a month ago and 98.5 cents per gallon higher than a year ago.

The national average price of gasoline has risen 0.6 cent per gallon in the past week, averaging $3.18 a gallon today. That’s up 3.5 cents per gallon from a month ago and $1.02 a gallon higher than a year ago.

“With the factors that drive prices higher now softening, I’m hopeful that in the next few weeks, we’ll start to see average gas prices declining,” said Patrick De Haan, head of petroleum analysis for GasBuddy. “However, motorists shouldn’t get too excited yet. Larger declines will likely not come until late September and October.”

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