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Weather blog: It’s been a summer hot streak for many

Summer hasn't been too bad in the CSRA, but it's a different story for many across the globe.
Summer Hot Streak
Summer Hot Streak(WRDW)
Published: Jul. 15, 2020 at 4:52 PM EDT|Updated: Jul. 15, 2020 at 5:42 PM EDT
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AUGUSTA, Ga. (WRDW/WAGT) - Summer so far for the CSRA hasn’t been too bad. Temperatures in June were actually below average for many in the CSRA. In 2019, we had already hit 100° or hotter 7 times by July 15th, but this year we still have yet to hit 100°. While it hasn’t been too hot for us, the rest of the globe has seen their temperatures climb.

Taking a Global Look | Above Average June

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the first half of this year saw near-record warmth around the globe. June 2020 tied Earth’s 3rd hottest June on record, tying with June 2015 for third place. Warm temperatures from January through June approached the second highest average in the 141 year old climate record according to scientists at NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information. Taking a closer look at the numbers, the average global temperature this past June was 1.66°F above the 20th-century average of 59.9°F. Average global temperatures were only hotter in June 2016 and June 2019. An interesting fact is that this was the 44th-consecutive June and the 426th-consecutive month with temperatures above average. Nine of the 10 warmest Junes on record have occurred since 2010. The year-to-date (YTD) average global temperature was also 1.93°F above the 20th-century average.

Check out the graphic below to see some interesting Climate Anomalies and Events that happened in June 2020:

A map of the world noting some of the most significant weather and climate events that occurred during June 2020.
A map of the world noting some of the most significant weather and climate events that occurred during June 2020.(NOAA)

Why so hot in the USA? | Upper-Level Ridging

We have strong upper-level ridging in place over much of the US which causes sinking air, drier conditions, and warmer temperatures. The jet stream separates warmer air from colder air and upper level ridging allows that warmer air to make its way further north as a result of the jet stream being pushed northward. This upper level weather pattern will continue to allow warm air masses to impact large portions of the US, including the CSRA. Check out the temperature outlook below for the USA over the next two weeks in July:

The majority of the USA will be feeling the heat over the next 8-14 days as temperatures are expected to be anywhere from 30 to 50% above average heading towards the end of July.
The majority of the USA will be feeling the heat over the next 8-14 days as temperatures are expected to be anywhere from 30 to 50% above average heading towards the end of July.(WRDW)

Here is a look at the 8-14 temperature outlook for the CSRA where temperatures are expected to be about 50% above average over the next two weeks:

High temperatures are expected to be about 40-50% above average over the next 8-14 days here in the CSRA.
High temperatures are expected to be about 40-50% above average over the next 8-14 days here in the CSRA.(WRDW)

It is always important to remember that during extremely hot and humid weather your body’s ability to cool itself is greatly challenged. Heat-related illnesses occur when the body heats too rapidly to cool itself properly or when too much fluid/salt is lost through dehydration and/or sweating. It is important to know the symptoms of excessive heat exposure and the appropriate responses. Check out the graphic from the National Weather Service below which describes the symptoms of heat exhaustion and heat stroke:

It is important to know the signs of heat related illnesses and what to do in the event that a friend, a loved one, or yourself experiences fatigue or exhaustion from exposure to extreme heat.
It is important to know the signs of heat related illnesses and what to do in the event that a friend, a loved one, or yourself experiences fatigue or exhaustion from exposure to extreme heat.(NOAA/SacramentoOES)

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