Government appeals ruling on FCC indecency rule

By: Associated Press
By: Associated Press

Thursday, August 26, 2010

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Federal regulators are appealing a recent court decision that struck down a 2004 government policy that says broadcasters can be fined for allowing even a single curse word to be uttered on live television.

A three-judge panel of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New York threw out the Federal Communications Commission policy last month, saying it was unconstitutionally vague.

In a filing on Thursday, the FCC and the Justice Department asked the court to reconsider that decision, warning that the ruling appears to undermine the FCC's entire approach to regulating indecency on the airwaves. The agencies want the three-judge panel or the full court to reconsider the decision.

(Copyright 2010 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


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  • by Anonymous Location: Martinez on Aug 26, 2010 at 02:45 PM
    I promise you kids, even elementary aged, hear worse than what you would on TV at school everyday, out playing with friends, etc. I mean really, I can understand the F-bomb and things like suck my........but ****, *****, ****, come on. I am not saying it is right, but really, pick your battles.
  • by James Location: 30906 on Aug 26, 2010 at 01:11 PM
    Stuff like that doesn`t really bother me. I went to a private, all-boys hi-school, spent 6 years in the Marines, worked as a mechanic for many years, worked in Merchant Marine, was a professional golfer...all of which seemed to require "cussin`"...
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