Death Row Appeals

By: ASSOCIATED PRESS
By: ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Supreme Court turned down appeals today
from two Georgia inmates who face capital punishment.
Neither Samuel Crowe and Joseph Williams face imminent
execution.
The court also cleared the way for Alabama, Mississippi and
Texas to set new execution dates for three inmates who were granted
last-minute reprieves by the justices last year.
The court blocked their executions last fall while it considered
a challenge to Kentucky's lethal injection procedures.
It is unclear whether the inmates can mount new appeals to stop
their executions, although the court's decision last week left the
door open to challenging lethal injection procedures in other
states where problems with administering the drugs are well
documented.
Georgia is WASHINGTON (AP) -- The Supreme Court turned down appeals today
from two Georgia inmates who face capital punishment.
Neither Samuel Crowe and Joseph Williams face imminent
execution.
The court also cleared the way for Alabama, Mississippi and
Texas to set new execution dates for three inmates who were granted
last-minute reprieves by the justices last year.
The court blocked their executions last fall while it considered
a challenge to Kentucky's lethal injection procedures.
It is unclear whether the inmates can mount new appeals to stop
their executions, although the court's decision last week left the
door open to challenging lethal injection procedures in other
states where problems with administering the drugs are well
documented.
Georgia is one of roughly three dozen states that use three
drugs in succession to put to sleep, paralyze and kill inmates.
Critics of the procedures have said that if the first drug is
administered incorrectly or in an insufficient dosage, the inmate
could suffer excruciating pain from the other two drugs. But
because the second drug is a paralytic, he would be unable to
express his discomfort.

(Copyright 2008 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
one of roughly three dozen states that use three
drugs in succession to put to sleep, paralyze and kill inmates.
Critics of the procedures have said that if the first drug is
administered incorrectly or in an insufficient dosage, the inmate
could suffer excruciating pain from the other two drugs. But
because the second drug is a paralytic, he would be unable to
express his discomfort.

(Copyright 2008 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


WRDW.com is happy to provide a forum for commenting and discussion. Please respect and abide by the house rules:

Keep it clean, keep it civil, keep it truthful, stay on topic, be responsible, share your knowledge, and please suggest removal of comments that violate these standards.

powered by Disqus
Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1212 Augusta, GA 30903 Main Telephone: (803) 278-1212 Newsroom: (803) 278-3111 Fax: (803) 442-4561
Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 17975789 - wrdw.com/a?a=17975789
Gray Television, Inc.